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K-9 REPORTING

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Learning Updates

WRITTEN LEARNING UPDATES

Written Learning Updates (formerly called report cards) are Ministry-required learning updates that are provided to families throughout the school year as another way that teachers inform families around student learning progress.  

In Central Okanagan Public Schools, there are several guiding principles that were co-constructed with teachers, principals, and vice-principals across all schools that we use to guide our approach to Written Learning Updates.

 

We believe that Written Learning Updates should:

  • Be clear and concise.

  • Empower students in taking ownership of their learning.

  • Be written in family-friendly language.

  • Be strength-based and focus on each unique student as a whole learner.  

  • Provide an overview of areas of growth and next steps in learning.

  • Be consistent and aligned across classrooms, grades, and schools.

WRITTEN LEARNING UPDATES

Consistent, concise, and meaningful Written Learning Updates that are in clear and accessible language enable parents/caregivers, students, and teachers to work together to support each student in their ongoing learning journey.


Each Written Learning Update must include:

  1. Communication of progress of student learning in all curricular areas currently being studied using the 
    4-point Learning Progress Continuum (see section 1 for more guidance on curricular areas to report on).

  2. Descriptive Feedback on areas of growth and next steps in learning. 

  3. Information on Student Self-Reflection of the Core Competencies and Student Goal setting (including where families can learn more about their child’s learning in this area).

  4. An update on student attendance.

Note: In Elementary Schools [K-5/6], English Language Arts and Français Langue, Comprehend and connect (reading, listening, viewing) and Create and communicate (writing, speaking, representing) are reported on separately using the Learning Progress Continuum.

Learning Continuum

1. LEARNING PROGRESS CONTINUUM

The 4-point Learning Progress Continuum, is a Ministry requirement in K-9.  Along with descriptive feedback, it is used to support learning throughout the school year.

 

The four stages on the continuum are Emerging, Developing, Proficient, and Extending.

Learning Progress Continuum (K-9).png
French Learning Progress Continuum (K-9).png

Below are further considerations to clarify the four stages on the Learning Progress Continuum:

Emerging

  • ‘Emerging’ may indicate that a student is just beginning to demonstrate learning in relation to the expected Learning Standards, or that a student is not yet able to demonstrate learning in relation to the expected Learning Standards.

    • If this is due to insufficient evidence, the student can be assigned an “IE” (see ‘Insufficient Evidence’ section below for more details).
       

  • Note: If a student is working with an IEP or LP they should not be assessed automatically as ‘emerging’ because they receive support.  If with the supports laid out in their learning plan they are consistently demonstrating learning in relation to the expected Learning Standards, then they should be assessed as ‘proficient’.

    • e.g., If in a student's learning plan they get support from an adult in writing, the student might be ‘emerging’ in their writing.  However, if they receive that same writing support in science, and for example can demonstrate their learning consistently in relation to the expected Learning Standards in science, then they should be assessed as ‘proficient’ in that curricular area.

Developing

  • ‘Developing’ indicates that a student is demonstrating learning in relation to the expected Learning Standards with growing consistency.

  • As students encounter new learning they often progress in their ability to demonstrate their learning over time. When students are provided with ongoing learning experiences, they work their way through the ‘developing’ stage on the Learning Progress Continuum and begin to show greater consistency in their ability to demonstrate the expected learning.

  • Students assessed as ‘developing’ may require occasional ongoing support to demonstrate their learning (e.g., a student can estimate reasonably with teacher guidance, but is still growing in their ability to estimate reasonably on their own).

  • Many students can be ‘developing’ in their learning.  This stage of the scale encompasses students who are beginning to show some consistency in demonstrating the expected learning, as well as those who have shown growing consistency but may still not quite be at the ‘proficient’ stage.

Proficient

  • Students assessed as ‘proficient’ are able to demonstrate their learning consistently in relation to the expected Learning Standards.

  • ‘Proficient’ is not a ‘B’ and is also not synonymous with perfection.  Students may still require support at times to demonstrate the expected learning, but primarily they are able to demonstrate the expected learning most of the time.

  • If at the time of the Written Learning Update a student is demonstrating their learning consistently, they should be assessed as ‘proficient’, even if they required support all throughout the term to get to where they are now.  It’s important that students are encouraged to ask for support in order to grow in their learning.

Extending

  • ‘Extending’ is a student demonstrating learning (in relation to the expected Learning Standards) with consistency and increasing depth and complexity.

  • ‘Extending’ is not an ‘A’, a bonus, or a reward, and does not necessarily require that students do a greater volume of work or work at a higher grade level.
     

  • Teachers support all learners with their ongoing growth, including supporting students who are ‘proficient’ in progressing towards ‘extending’.
     

  • Teachers can support students in ‘extending’ in many ways.  Below are just some examples on how students can demonstrate their learning with greater depth and complexity:

    • By demonstrating their learning in multiple ways (e.g., student is able to demonstrate multiple ways of analyzing and interpreting data).

    • By applying their thinking further (e.g., student comparing two eras in history adds an in-depth comparison of both the historical eras with our current era).

    • By applying their learning to other curricular areas (e.g., student incorporates mathematical concepts in their artwork).

    • By exploring more complex Learning Standards (e.g., the class is learning about increasing patterns and a student explores patterns that grow in more complex ways).

    • By connecting their learning to their local and/or global community (e.g., student learning about the environment takes on environmental activism in their community).

    • By supporting the learning of others (e.g., student takes a lead role in teaching other students dance concepts in Physical Education).

Guidance for Curricular Areas to Report on in Elementary (K-5/6) and Middle/Secondary (Gr.6-9)

Elementary Curricular Areas to be Reporting On.png

*Core Academics (in light blue) to be reported using the 4-point Learning Progress Continuum on every Written Learning Update.

 

*Areas such as Arts Education, Career Education, Core French, and ADST (in light orange) must be reported on using the 4-point Learning Progress Continuum on at least one Written Learning Update (as they must be taught at some point throughout the school year).

 

*If not using a whole term comment on a Written Learning Update, descriptive feedback is to be provided for each curricular area that is being reported on (see section 2 on descriptive feedback for more details).

Middle and Secondary (6-9) Curricular Areas to be Reporting On.png

*All curricular areas currently being studied in a given term must be reported using the 4-point Learning Progress Continuum on the Written Learning Update for that term.

 

*In the Gr. 6-9 French Immersion Program, Physical & Health Education, Arts Education Courses, Career Education, and/or ADST courses may be taught in English or French depending on available staffing/offerings.

 

*If not using a whole term comment on a Written Learning Update, descriptive feedback is to be provided for each curricular area that is being reported on (see section 2 on descriptive feedback for more details).

Guidance on Using the Learning Progress Continuum to Support Learning, Assessment, and Communication of Student Learning with Families

Teachers use the Learning Progress Continuum and descriptive feedback to communicate ongoing student learning during the school year (both through informal learning updates and formal Written Learning Updates). 

 

*Note: student behavior and engagement should not contribute to a student’s assessment on the Learning Progress Continuum but instead should be highlighted within the written descriptive feedback.

While students can show “growth” (in general) in their learning, the Learning Progress Continuum is used to specifically evaluate “progress” (which is growth in relation to the expected Curriculum Learning Standards - i.e., where they are in relation to where we expect them to be in their learning).  

 

For example, on a Written Learning Update for a Gr. 5 student, you might highlight their growth in the descriptive feedback that notes their ability to use strategies to solve 2-digit multiplication equations, however when evaluating their progress (i.e., growth in relation to Curriculum Learning Standards) they would be assessed as ‘emerging’ on the Learning Progress Continuum (as they are not yet able to use strategies to solve 3-digit multiplication equations - an expectation in the Gr. 5 Learning Standards). 

The following steps outline a recommended process that teachers can use to support ongoing student learning and reporting that makes use of the Learning Progress Continuum:

  1. Teacher identifies Learning Standards (Curricular Competencies using the content) for students to explore.
     

  2. Teacher develops and/or co-creates criteria relevant to the Learning Standards, including students in the process whenever possible.
     

  3. Teacher models and/or provides examples of learning in relation to the Learning Standards.
     

  4. Students participate in learning opportunities and experiences that provide them multiple opportunities to demonstrate their learning in relation to the Learning Standards.
     

  5. Teacher and students collect, document, and reflect on evidence of learning. 
     

  6. Teacher assesses and provides students with ongoing descriptive feedback.
     

  7. Teacher collects both formal and informal evidence on how students demonstrated their learning to inform their assessment in relation to the Learning Progress Continuum and to make recommendations to support their next steps in learning.
     

  8. Students are provided with opportunities to self-reflect and respond to ongoing feedback to demonstrate their growth and progress over time.

Supporting Students in the Shift From Letter Grades to the Learning Progress Continuum

Teachers can support students who were previously familiar with letter grades in understanding the Learning Progress Continuum by:

  • using the language of the Learning Progress Continuum with their students through their instruction and real-time feedback;

  • verbally giving students descriptive feedback in real time in class so they become familiar with the format of identifying their strengths and their next steps in learning;

  • co-constructing assessment criteria with students so they come to understand what “Emerging”, “Developing”, “Proficient”, and “Extending” look like;

  • providing students with opportunities to self-assess their own learning using the Learning Progress Continuum; and

  • as a learning task, having students design their own learning activity with assessment criteria.

Descriptive Feedback

2. DESCRIPTIVE FEEDBACK

Descriptive feedback is the most important part of all assessments (formative and summative) 

 

Descriptive feedback empowers students to adjust what they are doing to continue developing their knowledge, skills, and understandings.  Knowing where a student is on a scale provides minimal information to families to help students move forward in their learning (e.g., if a student is “developing” in Math, descriptive feedback is needed to help us understand what the student can do and what their next steps are within that curricular area and/or Learning Standard). 

 

Descriptive feedback helps families understand where their children are in their learning, what their next steps are, and how we can work together to best support their children in their continued growth. 

QUALITY DESCRIPTIVE FEEDBACK CRITERIA

  • highlights areas of growth and next steps in relation to Learning Standards.

  • shares any helpful strategies and ways to support the student (including any additional supports the student may be receiving).

  • describes student’s behaviour, including attitudes, work habits, effort, and/or social responsibility as it relates to their learning.

  • is concise (does not communicate progress on every learning standard, rather provides a few notable strengths and next steps within the various curricular areas).

  • does not simply note what was taught (note: Written Learning Updates are about the child and not an overview of the curriculum).

  • uses family-friendly, strength-based language (as families may vary widely in their familiarity with educational terms and levels of English language proficiency).

  • uses pronouns and names as determined by the student (see below for more details).

*Note: paragraphs and/or point form can be used for descriptive feedback

For K-9 teachers who are the primary teachers for a group of students across several cross-curricular areas (whole term comment):

  • descriptive feedback (see criteria above) is to be provided on the whole child as a learner across the curriculum, their progress on their foundational skills (literacy and numeracy), as well as any other areas of significant note for the student in their learning.  

Some examples of additional “areas of significant note” to consider providing descriptive feedback on for a student within a Written Learning Update:

  • a student is extending themselves significantly further in Art;

  • a student is needing significant support to participate in Physical and Health Education; 

  • a student has been engaging in a large cross-curricular inquiry throughout the term;

  • a student has requested that specific learning they are proud of be shared with their family; 

  • a student has conferenced with the teacher and the teacher captured their reflection to be included in their descriptive feedback.

For K-9 teachers of individual curricular areas:

  • descriptive feedback (see criteria above) is to be provided for each student in relation to the Learning Standards in that individual curricular area on a Written Learning Update.

A consideration for K-9 prep teachers with a large number of students across the whole school:

  • as noted above, teachers of individual curricular area are required to provide descriptive feedback for each student on a Written Learning Update, therefore, a consideration for prep teachers with a large number of students is to create a standard comment that applies to many of their students who are proficient and then generate individual comments for students who are not proficient (i.e., Emerging, Developing, or Extending).

  • for example, a more standard comment for students who are proficient in a Foods prep class may read,
    This term, we explored basic food handling and simple preparation techniques.  Through design thinking, we generated, tested, and shared our ideas for dishes with each other, and reflected on our overall process to determine how to improve our dishes in the future.  Your food creations and your ability to reflect and improve your cooking process demonstrated your proficiency in Foods this term.

  • note: when entering descriptive feedback into MyEd, teachers can enter the standard proficient comment for the first student listed and then use the Ctrl+D shortcut and it will copy that comment for all students in the roster (and then the teacher can go into the individual students who require a unique comment and update it accordingly).

Example descriptive feedback for a group of students across several curricular areas

Sample Comment - Teaching Across Several Curricular Areas.png

Example descriptive feedback for teachers of individual curricular areas

Sample Comment - One Curricular Area.png

PRONOUNS AND NAMES ON WRITTEN LEARNING UPDATES

When considering which names and pronouns will appear on Written Learning Updates, it is important that the decision is student-led and that we determine from the student their desired approach.​

  • In alignment with the Human Rights Code of BC, students have the right to self-identification, and to decide the name(s) and pronoun(s) by which they are addressed. This includes students who have not made official changes to their name and gender identity in MyEdBC.

  • While graduation diplomas and transcripts from the Ministry of Education require legal name, Written Learning Updates use the “usual name” as listed in MyEdBC (note: changes to usual name in MyEdBC can be made by administrators, counsellors, and/or school office staff).

  • Using the same pronoun for all students (e.g., “they”) does not always reflect the pronouns a student may want on their Written Learning Updates, and in cases where there is uncertainty, teachers are encouraged to connect with administrators and/or counsellors for further guidance.

  • Note: Some students may not be “out” beyond the school community, and may choose to express their name and/or gender differently outside of school. When communicating with a parent/guardian, be sure to determine from the student which name and pronouns to use before writing and sending home a Written Learning Update (as well as other items such as progress updates, digital portfolios, yearbooks, etc.).

Board Policy - 452 - Discrimination as it Pertains to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

“The Board of Education is committed to a safe, positive and inclusive learning and working environment for all students and employees regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity… [where] all members of the school community learn and work together in an atmosphere of respect and safety, free from discrimination, harassment and/or exclusion.”
 

Self-Reflection

3. SELF-REFLECTION OF THE CORE COMPETENCIES
& GOAL SETTING

In the new K-12 Student Reporting Policy, each Written Learning Update must include information on student self-reflection of the Core Competencies and student goal setting (including where families can learn more about their child’s learning in this area).

Process is significantly more important than product when it comes to this requirement.  Through ongoing self-reflection and goal setting within the Core Competencies, students gain greater ownership and agency in their learning.  In BC’s curriculum, Curricular Competencies are all built from Core Competencies.  Therefore, by designing learning through Curricular Competencies, Big Ideas, and Content, teachers are already providing students opportunities to learn about and develop their Core Competencies.  The key is to notice, name, and nurture the various Core Competencies throughout all the learning experiences that teachers design for their students.    

Teachers can support goal setting and self-reflection of the Core Competencies by:

  • explicitly developing the language of Core Competencies through authentic experiences and learning opportunities within the various Curricular Competencies.

  • providing ongoing support and repeated opportunities for students to set goals and reflect on their learning and progress towards their goals. 

  • designing reflection opportunities that are integrated across the whole curriculum (and not a separate reflection activity that is disconnected from the learning going on in classrooms.

Format and process of the self-reflection and goal setting are determined at the school level. Schools are encouraged to develop alignment on how they engage students in self-reflection of Core Competencies and goal setting, as it provides consistency and predictability for students, staff, and families.

Throughout the school year, teachers are to build the language and provide students the opportunity to explore all the Core Competencies (Communication, Collaboration, Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking, Positive Personal & Cultural Identity, Personal Awareness & Responsibility, and Social Responsibility). 

Updates Core Competencies.jpg

When it comes to student self-reflection of the Core Competencies there are a variety of approaches teachers and/or schools might take:

  • they might support students in reflecting on the various Core Competencies each term or throughout the school year;

  • they might choose to support their class or whole school in focusing on self-reflection within one specific Core Competency in a given term or throughout the school year, 

  • they might also provide students agency in allowing them to choose which Core Competency they complete ongoing self-reflections on throughout the term or school year.   

Note: this requirement is intentionally noted as a self-reflection and not as a self-assessment.  Students are engaging in reflection on the Core Competencies to identify growth and next steps, rather than assessing or evaluating where they are on a scale.

Goal setting is also intended to be flexible and personalized. Like student self-reflection of Core Competencies, there are a variety of approaches schools and teachers might take to goal setting with their students:

  • they might support students in developing and reflecting on goals across the various Core Competencies;

  • they might choose to support students in going deeper in developing and reflecting on one significant goal within one Core Competency,

  • they might provide students choice on which Core Competencies they set goals for; 

  • they might have students set different goals throughout the school year or support students in gathering evidence and reflecting on the same goals all year long.
     

Example comment for this requirement on a Written Learning Update:

“We continue to explore Thinking, Communicating, and Personal/Social Core Competencies throughout all of the curriculum.  Please see the attached reflection portfolio that your child completed on their Core Competency growth and the individual goals they set for themselves.”

 

Another example comment for this requirement on a Written Learning Update:

“This term, the students were introduced to the "Positive Personal and Cultural Identity Competency" which is the awareness and understanding of the facets that contribute to a healthy sense of oneself.  Please see your child’s portfolio for details on your child’s goal setting and reflection on this Core Competency.”

Note: Schools that are taking a school-wide approach to student reflection of Core Competencies and goal setting are encouraged to use a sample comment like the ones above in the “School Message” at the top of all Written Learning Updates (to simplify the approach for teachers and provide consistent messaging to families).

Note: there is no requirement to put copies of any artifacts of student self-reflection of Core Competencies and goal setting in a student’s file.

SCHEDULE & CONSIDERATIONS

Considerations for Schedule of Written Learning Updates​

In the K-12 Student Reporting Policy Framework, schools must provide a minimum of 5 student Learning Updates during the school year: at least 3 Written Learning Updates (i.e., report cards) and at least 2 informal Learning Updates (e.g., student-led conferences, parent-teacher conferences, open house, celebrations of learning).  
 

A consideration for schools is that their first Learning Update occurs early on in the school year, semester, or term in order to inform families of their child’s initial progress in their learning.  Below is an example schedule that would meet this requirement:

K-9 Schedule.png

Considerations Prior to Written Learning Updates​ Going Home

Teachers and students communicate student learning with families throughout the school year so that families are well-informed about their children’s learning progress prior to Written Learning Updates going home.  

Written Learning Updates can be supported by:

  • sending families a separate learning overview (e.g., course outline or term overview) prior to Written Learning Updates being sent home.

  • communicating student learning with families throughout the year through a variety of formats such as: sending home learning evidence, providing progress reports, sharing digital or paper-based portfolios, etc.

  • informing families about the Learning Standards and experiences that their children are engaging in throughout the term (note: Written Learning Updates are about the child and not an overview of the curriculum).

  • having conversations with families prior to Written Learning Updates going home, particularly if there is insufficient evidence of learning for the teacher to accurately assess a student and/or there are significant concerns about a student’s learning progress.

Schedule & Considerations
IEPs/LPs/AIPs

IEPs / LPs / AIPs

Considerations for Students on Individualized Education Plans (IEPs)

An Individual Education Plan (IEP) is a documented plan developed for Ministry-designated students with special needs that describes individualized goals, adaptations, modifications, services to be provided, and measures for assessing achievement.

 

As with all other students, each Written Learning Update for a student on an IEP should describe the student's growth and next steps, as well as strategies/supports provided to the student to support their ongoing learning.

 

A copy of the IEP does not need to go home with the Written Learning Update, given that a copy of a student’s IEP is sent home at the beginning and at the end of the school year, and any time significant changes or updates are made to the goals/objectives in their IEP.

 

Written Learning Updates requirements for students on IEPs:

K-9 IEP (with H and R designations noted).png

*Note: for students on IEPs working on different or below grade-level Learning Standards, we are required by the Ministry to assess them based on the Learning Standards they are working on (and not by the Learning Standards of the grade they are in).


Reminder: Students working with the supports of an IEP may not necessarily be ‘emerging’ on the Learning Progress Continuum.  If with the supports noted in their IEP they are showing grade-level proficiency they should be assessed as ‘proficient’.


Example: If a student receives direct support in their IEP to support their classroom interactions, they may at the same time be able to consistently demonstrate the expected Learning Standards in Math, and would therefore be assessed as ‘proficient’ in Math.


Example: If a student receives direct support in writing in their IEP, they may be ‘emerging’ in their writing, but with that same writing support they may be demonstrating the expected Learning Standards in Science with growing consistency and would therefore be assessed as ‘developing’ in Science.

Considerations for Students on Learning Plans (LPs)

A Learning Plan (LP) is a documented plan developed by the school that describes individualized goals, strategies, supports, and services to be provided.  

As with all other students, each Written Learning Update for a student on an LP should describe the student's growth and next steps, as well as strategies/supports provided to the student to support their ongoing learning.

A copy of the LP does not need to go home with the Written Learning Update, given that a copy of a student’s LP is sent home at the beginning and at the end of the school year, and any time significant changes or updates are made to the goals/objectives in their LP.

Written Learning Updates requirements for students on LPs

All students on LPs are to be assessed on grade-level Learning Standards, even if they are working on below grade-level Learning Standards in their Learning Plan (LP), as this is not a Ministry-designated IEP.  Students working on below-grade level Learning Standards in their Learning Plan (LP) would be assessed as ‘emerging’ on the Learning Progress Continuum as they are not yet demonstrating learning in relation to the Learning Standards for their grade.  The descriptive feedback within the Written Learning Update is where teachers can provide more details on the student’s growth and next steps in relation to the Learning Standards that the student is exploring in their Learning Plan (LP).

 

The following comment should be provided within a whole term comment or within each subject area that is supported by the student's Learning Plan (LP):

“This assessment reflects progress with the supports as noted in the student's Learning Plan (LP). See LP for more details.”
 

Reminder: Students working with the supports of an LP may not necessarily be ‘emerging’ on the Learning Progress Continuum.  If with the supports noted in their Learning Plan (LP) they are showing grade-level proficiency they should be assessed as ‘proficient’. 

Example: If a student receives direct support in their LP to support their classroom interactions, they may at the same time be able to consistently demonstrate the expected Learning Standards in Math, and would therefore be assessed as ‘proficient’ in Math.


Example: If a student receives direct support in writing in their LP, they may be ‘emerging’ in their writing, but with that same writing support they may be demonstrating the expected Learning Standards in Science with growing consistency and would therefore be assessed as ‘developing’ in Science.

Considerations for English Language Learning (ELL) Students

The following are student reporting guidelines for students who are accessing English Language Learning (ELL) supports.

At each reporting period:

  • ELL teachers: all students on an AIP (Annual Instruction Plan) who are receiving ELL supports will have an “ELL” course attached to them in MyEdBC for ELL teachers to provide a comment which should include descriptive feedback on:

    • the language development services the student is receiving

    • the student’s progress on their literacy goals

    • ways that families can support the student in their learning 

    • note: a copy of the student’s AIP does not go home with the Written Learning Update

  • Classroom teachers: as with all other students, each Written Learning Update for an ELL student should include a comment to describe the student’s growth and next steps, as well as strategies/supports provided to the student to support their ongoing learning (note: no specific comment needs to be added on the student being an ELL learner as there is a specific "ELL" course on the Written Learning Update with comments from the ELL teacher).

Further Student Reporting Guidance for Classroom Teachers with ELL Students

All students receiving ELL supports are to be assessed on grade-level Learning Standards, even if they are working on below grade-level Learning Standards, as they do not have a Ministry-designated IEP.  

 

For ELL students working on below-grade level Learning Standards, they would be assessed as ‘emerging’ on their Written Learning Update as they are not yet demonstrating learning in relation to the Learning Standards for their grade.  

Note: A version of the following statement can be utilized when language limitations make it difficult to assess the student. The following opening statement could be used in one subject area or if it affects more than one subject, it could go in the Term Comment and be followed by a statement about areas of growth they have shown:

"This student is an identified English Language Learner (ELL) and is not yet able to demonstrate grade-level learning in     subject(s)    . (followed by a statement about areas of growth the student has shown and their next steps in learning).

 

Reminder: ELL students receiving direct support may not necessarily be ‘emerging’ on the Learning Progress Continuum.  If with the ELL supports provided a student is showing grade-level proficiency they would be assessed as ‘proficient’. 

Example: If a student receives direct support from their ELL teacher or other support staff, they may at the same time be able to consistently demonstrate the expected Learning Standards in Math, and would therefore be assessed as ‘proficient’ in Math.

 

Example: If a student receives direct ELL support in reading, they may be ‘emerging’ in their reading, but with that same reading support they may be demonstrating the expected Learning Standards in Science with growing consistency and would therefore be assessed as ‘developing’ in Science.

Insufficient Evidence

INSUFFICIENT EVIDENCE OF LEARNING (IE)

The “IE” symbol is used to alert parents/caretakers when students, for a variety of reasons, have not provided sufficient evidence of learning in relation to the Learning Standards. This means that teachers do not have enough information (observations, conversations, and products) to adequately and accurately assess a student. The "IE" symbol may be used on any Written Learning Update. 

Some examples of when an “IE” symbol might be required due to insufficient learning evidence:

  • when a student has recently moved to a new school or district (e.g., arriving a few weeks before the end of a term/semester).

  • when a student has been ill or away from school for a significant period of time (e.g., prolonged student illness, travelling for several weeks, absent for the majority of a given term/semester, etc.).

  • when a student has not demonstrated significant learning evidence (observations, conversations, and products) for the teacher to provide an accurate assessment.

Teachers and families work together when a potential assessment issue arises related to insufficient evidence of learning.  When an "IE" reporting symbol has been assigned, teachers, students, and parents/caretakers work together to discuss the situation, including the subject areas where evidence of learning is unavailable, the potential needs of the student and possible solutions and supports. Where applicable, teachers should provide a clear timeline for resolution, student needs, and a specific plan of action to arrive at a possible solution.

At times, there may be insufficient evidence of learning at the end of the school year.  In the new Ministry Reporting Policy, a final mark of “IE” at the end of a school year must be converted to a point on the 4-point Learning Progress Continuum.  Therefore, instead of an “IE” for a final mark, the student would be provided an “Emerging” with the following comment: 

The standing of “Emerging” has been provided as the student has not shown evidence of the expected learning outcomes”. 

MyEducation BC

MYEDUCATION BC

As we adopt the new K-12 Student Reporting Policy Framework, and create alignment and consistency with student reporting across all our schools, we require a centralized location for student reporting, student attendance, and student tracking.  MyEducationBC (MyEdBC) is the Student Information System used by the Ministry of Education and all districts in British Columbia, and is the centralized location for student reporting in Central Okanagan Public Schools.    

While all schools in this new reporting framework will use MyEdBC, there are a variety of approaches and considerations for schools to consider.  Below are templates and example approaches depending on your context: 

Draft District Written Learning Update Template (Main Teacher for All Subjects) (5)_Page_1

Written Learning Update template - for elementary and middle school teachers who are the primary teachers for a group of students across several curricular areas

Sample Written Learning Update Template (Main Teacher for All Subjects) (8)_Page_1.jpg

Written Learning Update example - for elementary and middle school teachers who are the primary teachers for a group of students across several curricular areas

Draft District K-9 Written Learning Update Template (Multiple Teachers for All Subjects) (

Written Learning Update template - for middle schools with several teachers across all curricular areas

Sample Written Learning Update Template (Multiple Teachers for All Subjects) (1)_Page_1.jp

Written Learning Update example - for middle schools with several teachers across all curricular areas

K-9 MyEdBC Written Learning Update Instructions_Page_1.jpg

K-9 Teacher - Written Learning Update

MyEd Instructions

A Guide to your child's Written Learning Update.jpg

A one-pager to provide K-9 parents more information on how to understand and have conversations with their child about their Written learning Update.

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